YOUNG AMBITION

We all dream when we’re young.  Some of us dream bigger than others.  The man who designed X-MEN: The Animated Series and directed its course for its crucial first season had the nerve, as an adolescent comic-book fan, to write to Stan Lee and ask him how to get into the comics business.  I can only imagine how earnest and sincere Will Meugniot’s original letter was.  You can see Marvel’s thoughtful response below.  The vision Will had for himself was a crucial element in our show’s success.  Twenty-six years after that letter, Will cared enough about a comic-book to fight every needed fight — and there were a lot of them — to keep X-MEN:TAS on track .  I’m sure teen-aged Will had no idea that he would one day find himself responsible for much of the creative direction of what would become, by some measures, the most successful comic-book-based series in television history, animated or live-action.  But sometimes it pays to dream big.

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THE X-MEN BOOK: We Need Testimonials

The book is NEARLY DONE!  Our publisher will get the manuscript from me in a couple of weeks, editing will begin, and we plan to have it out this summer.  Please let me know what you think of Will Meugniot’s first mock-up  of a design for the cover (below).  I’m sure it will evolve.  One last favor: I have a chapter called “Testimonials,” where fans write, in about a page or so (no set length), about what watching X-MEN:TAS meant to them.  There is still room for a few more in the book, but I will need them quickly.  (You can send them as document files to xmentas92@gmail.com.  We’d really appreciate it.)  When the book comes out, it will be available on Amazon and at bookstores.  But it you buy it from the publisher directly (Jacobsbrownmediagroup.com), or from my table at a Con, you will be sure to get an autographed copy.  Also, I am assured that the publisher’s website will be set up to accept pre-sale orders (not sure when yet) before the actual date of publication.

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GETTING THE OPENING RIGHT

People love the opening titles of X-MEN:TAS.  I even have a short chapter in the upcoming book about their creation.  In the short time given Larry Houston and Will Meugniot (a few days?) to create the now-memorable opening sequence, Larry’s first storyboard pass was exciting, but it just wasn’t quite right.  It, perhaps influenced by Stan Lee’s attempt at coming up with a titles narration, was far more focused on the plight of mutants as hunted creatures than on the X-Men as a team.  The opening “Wanted Poster” image below was followed by police helicopter.

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Margaret Loesch wisely decided that we needed to focus more on our X-Men characters, so Will helped Larry re-focus the opening titles on our characters (many of whom were newer and less familiar to Stan).  The first half of the 75-second sequence now became an exuberant introduction to the family of characters that we would be living with for five years, complete with their names in bold print.  It worked.  With the new images bonded with driving music, viewers felt the spirit of the series at the beginning of every episode.  Between Larry, Will, and Margaret, they found the heart of X-MEN:TAS.

We’re Back: It Started with “Pryde”

Happy New Year!  2017 is the 25th anniversary of the premiere preview of X-MEN:TAS (10/31/92).  It’s going to be quite a year.  In February we’re going to be at San Diego Comic Fest with three other X-MEN:TAS writers and Series Producer Larry Houston.  If you can, swing by and say hello.  We’re going to have 4 or 5 panels about the series on Saturday and Sunday.  We should also have more news about THE BOOK — our history of the series.  Publishing is currently set for this summer, so we’re going to be incredibly busy trying to finish it up.  As a fun remembrance, I thought I’d put up a storyboard page from 1989’s “Pryde of the X-MEN” (courtesy of X-MEN:TAS leader Will Meugniot).  So many of the people that got our series on the air and made it as good as it was worked on this one-off attempt at getting the X-Men right for TV.  It didn’t succeed, but without it, we very well might not have had the opportunity to do our version of X-MEN:TAS.

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X-MEN vs. Street Fighter

There is an endless fascination of “who would beat who” in the immense, ever-expanding world of superheroes.  I can’t imagine a more classic (and over-used) comic-book cover than the pairing of one beloved character or team against another.  It’s also a no-brainer for 2-D or 3-D-Fighter video games: combat is their essence.  Feature movies have tried “A vs. B” with mixed success (Alien vs. Predator, The Avengers: Civil War).  It doesn’t even need to make any sense — it just sets up a challenge, a deeply human competition complete with a satifying mix of spectacle.  It compels us: we gotta know who wins.  I was reminded of this yesterday when I saw the announcement of the most recent Capcom-vs.-Marvel game, “Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite,” specially featuring characters from X-Men and Street Fighter (see below).   This spoke to me since I and producer Will Muegniot and my wife Julia and writer Michael Edens were part of the core creative teams on both of these animated series, nearly back-to-back.  Their worlds were so different that it never would have occurred to any of us to pit one set of characters against the other.  But that didn’t stop a more imaginative Capcom from creating a 20-year run of incredibly successful games.  Powers and fighting were an essential part of our stories on X-MEN:TAS and even more so on Streetfighter:TAS.  But the human side of the characters was even more important to us.  We could tell a good story with very little fighting, but we couldn’t tell a lasting story without the humanity.

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@XMENTAS hits 3000 followers on Twitter!

Thanks again!  It took a couple of months for our Twitter site (@xmentas) to get to 1000 followers on August 3rd.  Then it took another 44 days to get to 2000 on September 16th.  Now it is the 28th of October, it’s 42 days later, and we just hit 3000!  Rogue is so excited she’s stomping a dinosaur (courtesy of X-MEN:TAS producer/designer Will Meugniot).  If you haven’t yet, please join us as Twitter followers.  We who contribute to the website appreciate your keeping in touch and staying part of our X-MEN:TAS family.  We will do everything we can to keep updating xmentas.com and responding to your tweets on Twitter.

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A TRUE WOLVERINE WEDNESDAY

Today, I am told, is Hugh Jackman’s birthday.  When his next movie soon comes out  — said to be his last as X-MEN character Wolverine — he will have been in our heads as that seminal character for 17 years.  It’s hard to overstate how important casting can be to a timeless character.  There are plenty of talented people that are dead wrong for their roles.  We take for granted that great characters are meant to be, just as they are.  But so much goes into the creation of a character that moves us — story, design, voice, attitude, dialogue, look, fellow cast members, budget, cultural climate — that the norm is a missed opportunity.  Not this time.

So, happy birthday, Hugh.  Len Wein (see middle below) created Wolverine’s essence in 1974.  Cal Dodd (see beside Len) brought us Wolverine’s voice in 1992.  Then Hugh Jackman (near below) finished the job in the year 2000 by bringing us Wolverine’s living incarnation.  As we celebrate a special Wolverine Wednesday with X-MEN:TAS designer Will Meugniot’s recent sketch, we thank these three and the hundreds of others who have contributed to making this character important to us.

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